is kyokushin a way of life to you ? [Archive] - Kyokushin4life

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ichigeki31
04-26-2006, 12:36 PM
well wat do u think about kyokushin is it to u is it just a hobby or does it mean to u ur whole life to me i really wanna make it kyokushin it is my dream to become a vanguard in kyokushin like filho etc share your opinions :lol: 8)

Buli0n
05-04-2006, 01:49 PM
is kyokushin a way of life to you ?

Yes ;)

Kyokushin555
05-05-2006, 11:09 PM
I would say kyokushin has a really big part in my life. I take the spirit of Kyokushin to heart when I train, and in everyday life. I have done many training methods that follow Sosai's and I believe that many people should follow them aswell. I do winter training barefoot, I have done solitary training on 2 occasions, once for 1 month, the other for 2 months. There is nothing that brings you closer to yourself when you are alone in nature and practicing Karate , only focusing on yourself. That I believe is a big part of what helped me improve. Being with myself alone for all that time practicing pushing my limts day after day after day make me realize the spirit of Kyokushin. There is so much more I can ramble on about kyokushin as a way of life. But for now I will leave it at that.

Chuck
08-30-2008, 12:26 AM
i know this is an old thread but still relavent i think

i am doing kyokushin to give me structure
i have just started but already in just 2 short weeks i have taken to it as a way of life i practice at home daily and am learning everything i can online and through sempai visser my sensei

i want to achieve my shodan by the time i am 30 and think that living the kyokushin way is the best way to achieve this

my ultimate goal as with most i think is 100-man kumite and to do this i am given all my dedication

Osu-EN1

Aunty Ichigeki
09-01-2008, 06:10 AM
Hey Chuck! Good to hear you're soaking up all that Sempai Visser has to offer. If ever you're in Welly make sure you drop by Mt Vic Dojo & make yourself known (esp if you like playing a ground game too! ;)... we're rare!) There's a few of us from Rhendy's branch on K4L so welcome! OSU-EN2

Ivansen
09-13-2008, 03:55 AM
In my case is still early to call it a way of life, although many of the same teachings of Kyokushin, I've already learn them from another places and times.
What I can say for sure is that I love it, sometimes I think I wouldn't be able not to practice. And being a practitioner I take it with constant proudness, like having an invisible Kyokushin flag around my back all the time :D.

Osu-EN1

GJEC
09-13-2008, 06:46 AM
Osu! (I'm from Enshin but the question applies the same)

Karate a way of life? No.

A discipline? Yes.

A challenge? Yes.

Excellent fitness training? Yes.

A worthwhile way to spend time and interact with others? Yes.

But to make the study of any Oriental Martial Art "A way of life" would mean over-writing the values and traditions of another culture over my own history and heritage. I'm as involved in karate and as dedicated as the next man, but being who I am comes first. I'm an Englishman who trains in karate, not a karateman who lives in England.

This question is not just about karate. A friend of mine studied Systema and followed his passion all the way to Mother Russia. He attended a course full of Europeans in combat dress and balaclava's. They were told at that point that they could not progress further unless they accepted baptism into the Russian Orthodox Church. Several stepped up willingly, but he refused and got the next plane home.

The moral? Enjoy your training, but use it to know yourself and never get so obsessed you forget who you really are.

Gary

Tameshigiri
09-13-2008, 01:31 PM
Is kyokushin a way of life to you ?


YES !

walshy
09-13-2008, 01:56 PM
Osu! (I'm from Enshin but the question applies the same)

Karate a way of life? No.

A discipline? Yes.

A challenge? Yes.

Excellent fitness training? Yes.

A worthwhile way to spend time and interact with others? Yes.

But to make the study of any Oriental Martial Art "A way of life" would mean over-writing the values and traditions of another culture over my own history and heritage. I'm as involved in karate and as dedicated as the next man, but being who I am comes first. I'm an Englishman who trains in karate, not a karateman who lives in England.

This question is not just about karate. A friend of mine studied Systema and followed his passion all the way to Mother Russia. He attended a course full of Europeans in combat dress and balaclava's. They were told at that point that they could not progress further unless they accepted baptism into the Russian Orthodox Church. Several stepped up willingly, but he refused and got the next plane home.

The moral? Enjoy your training, but use it to know yourself and never get so obsessed you forget who you really are.

Gary

Osu Good post, have to agree with you. I feel karate and martial arts in general should be taken to a level personal to yourself. Everybody gets something different from them. I have a job with quite long hours and a wife and three children, so I can't train and devote as much time as I would if I was a single man.
So yes I do take a serious approach to my Kyokushin, but really can't make it a way of life(although sometimes my wife thinks i do;))

Mike95765
09-13-2008, 08:53 PM
I aspire to make Kyokushin a way of life for me although at my age (AARP member) my perspective is a bit different. I don't have a Kyokushin dojo near me and am in the process of trying to find people to train with and perhaps to start a dojo here in Sacramento. Sac. seems to have lots of interest in karate but relatively few places to train for a state capital and a metropolitan area of about 1 million people. Just the same, I love to learn, train and am in the process of installing a makiwara and heavy bag at home. So maybe it already is a way of life for me.

Dent
09-13-2008, 10:49 PM
Osu!


But to make the study of any Oriental Martial Art "A way of life" would mean over-writing the values and traditions of another culture over my own history and heritage. I'm as involved in karate and as dedicated as the next man, but being who I am comes first. I'm an Englishman who trains in karate, not a karateman who lives in England.

The moral? Enjoy your training, but use it to know yourself and never get so obsessed you forget who you really are.


It's all about perspective, isn't it? :)

I see Karate as something that is there for all of us, and we can all take a tremendous amount from it. (Strangely, the exact amount that we put in... Go figure... ;) ) It's going to be different for each of us, and those differences will be reflected in every aspect of our lives. As far as training goes, I don't think we need to become anything other than better versions of ourselves.

Osu!

GJEC
09-14-2008, 07:19 AM
Osu! Dent,

I agree.

We are the product of every experience we ever have, good and bad, and most of my experiences in MA have been positive and helpful.

What concerns me in others though is where they go madly into the whole Eastern bit - you know, the full monty, quoting the motto's as if they're divine truths and Osu'ing their mum at breakfast time. Not good. I even knew one chap (an Instructor) who told me that anytime he had a problem in his life he asked himself, "What would Sosai do?" which has scary echoes to the "What would Jesus do?" people. (Note: You can never get to 'know yourself' if you use someone else's answers every time you have a problem) Another redesigned his whole house Japanese style and expected his elderly (Polish) parents to kneel on the floor when they came visiting. I'm sure they were delighted with that. If that's what people mean as making MA a way of life, that's way out of my league.

As you say, it's all about perspective. Some people are easily influenced and if they have no strong sense of self will jump on anything that offers an alternative, but it's not reality, it's escapism. If it keeps them off the streets and off hard drugs though, I can't knock it!

Gary

Dent
09-14-2008, 01:34 PM
Osu! Gary,

What concerns me in others though is where they go madly into the whole Eastern bit - you know, the full monty, quoting the motto's as if they're divine truths and Osu'ing their mum at breakfast time. Not good. I even knew one chap (an Instructor) who told me that anytime he had a problem in his life he asked himself, "What would Sosai do?" which has scary echoes to the "What would Jesus do?" people. (Note: You can never get to 'know yourself' if you use someone else's answers every time you have a problem) Another redesigned his whole house Japanese style and expected his elderly (Polish) parents to kneel on the floor when they came visiting. I'm sure they were delighted with that. If that's what people mean as making MA a way of life, that's way out of my league.

As you say, it's all about perspective. Some people are easily influenced and if they have no strong sense of self will jump on anything that offers an alternative, but it's not reality, it's escapism. If it keeps them off the streets and off hard drugs though, I can't knock it!

Gary

You do have the best turn of phrase! :D (Osu-ing Mum at breakfast indeed! :D )

You've got me on the house thing though. I do love so much of the Japanese architecture. If I had the cash... Oh, and as far as other advantages go, my in-laws are getting up there too. Chances of them wanting to kneel... ;)

That glass is more than half full! :D

Osu!

Ivansen
09-14-2008, 05:53 PM
Well, in my opinion there's nothing wrong with having your house designed Japanese/Korean/Chinese/Thai (or other) style. I do think is pushing it a bit by making them to kneel :D. Although the idea of people entering without shoes is kinda nice, the floors are always clean, it's a good feeling. I stronly believe you can do anything you want having inspiration or beliefs for a culture, but not just because they do it, but because you saw it or felt it and you liked it, so you wanna do it as well.
I think everyone should embrace what they believe in, without losing their original and own cultural values or identity.

Nix
09-14-2008, 08:55 PM
You've got me on the house thing though. I do love so much of the Japanese architecture. If I had the cash... Oh, and as far as other advantages go, my in-laws are getting up there too. Chances of them wanting to kneel... ;)I think you should set up a few house rules for inlaws, but don't stop at kneeling. Guests should always keep their head lower than yours, and also refer to you as Shōgun. Sacrifices (food, trinkets, saké...) must be given to an ancient Japanese deity which in return will grant them good faith ...or not. The deity will actually take form of a large wooden statue, which by coincidence looks very much like you. Noone may ever look directly at the statue. Try to have them rehearse new poetic phrases which will please the statue. If you play your cards right, you can start accepting guided tours for low low prices. I claim only a small portion of your profits.

GJEC
09-14-2008, 09:12 PM
:D

The thought of the mother-in-law bowing deeply as I stride boldly into the room with a Hawk on my arm suddenly seems very appealing.

Seriously, it's up to everyone to decide how much of their life their training becomes and how much of their personality is altered accordingly. My advice is don't build your whole reality around it, as training for many is a temporary thing. A change of job, marriage or an injury might mean leaving it all behind, so enjoy it and appreciate it, but don't let it take over who you really are.

Gary

Ziyaad
09-15-2008, 05:02 AM
I would say. After my religion, Kyokushi is the most important thing to me( a way of life).

Dent
09-15-2008, 02:54 PM
Osu!

I think you should set up a few house rules for inlaws, but don't stop at kneeling. Guests should always keep their head lower than yours, and also refer to you as Shōgun. Sacrifices (food, trinkets, saké...) must be given to an ancient Japanese deity which in return will grant them good faith ...or not. The deity will actually take form of a large wooden statue, which by coincidence looks very much like you. Noone may ever look directly at the statue. Try to have them rehearse new poetic phrases which will please the statue. If you play your cards right, you can start accepting guided tours for low low prices. I claim only a small portion of your profits.

:D

The thought of the mother-in-law bowing deeply as I stroll boldly into the room with a Hawk on my arm suddenly seems very appealing.

Hot diggity dog!!! I have to show this to my wife!!! If I can do this, Nix, royalties will certainly come your way! :D

Osu!

vapor
09-15-2008, 05:36 PM
:D

The thought of the mother-in-law bowing deeply as I stride boldly into the room with a Hawk on my arm suddenly seems very appealing.


Oh my, the visual of a hawk is too much!! :D

vapor

jcc
09-15-2008, 05:43 PM
I think you should set up a few house rules for inlaws, but don't stop at kneeling. Guests should always keep their head lower than yours, and also refer to you as Shōgun. Sacrifices (food, trinkets, saké...) must be given to an ancient Japanese deity which in return will grant them good faith ...or not. The deity will actually take form of a large wooden statue, which by coincidence looks very much like you. Noone may ever look directly at the statue. Try to have them rehearse new poetic phrases which will please the statue. If you play your cards right, you can start accepting guided tours for low low prices. I claim only a small portion of your profits.

Osu!


Hot diggity dog!!! I have to show this to my wife!!! If I can do this, Nix, royalties will certainly come your way! :D

Osu!

Osu! Dent,

Do you mean these rules don´t already stand in your house? I am suprised (but then again. I´m not married ;) :D)!

OSU-EN2

Dent
09-16-2008, 07:59 PM
Osu!

Do you mean these rules don´t already stand in your house? I am suprised (but then again. I´m not married ;) :D)!


I think I know why... :cool: :D

Osu!

Roadrunner
09-18-2008, 05:40 PM
Yes I would say Kyokushin is my way of life, It is the way I do everything, I have been told that Kyokushin is the other women. I am a second generation Kyokushin instructor so I guess that says it all. Sometime I eel sorry for ,y wife but she supports my training and life style 100%

ViKing
10-05-2008, 08:13 AM
I've tried many different styles but was never satisfied until I discovered Kyokushin. I think about Kyokushin when I go to sleep and when I wake up. My mid term goal is to travel to Japan and train full time. I would love to be able to train all day every day.

andrewkyokushin
10-05-2008, 07:24 PM
YES!!

I have been brought up since the age of 4 yrs old in Kyokushin...actually, probably a little more because i was 4yrs old when i could join the dojo, but was in the garden with my uncle learning it before. I am 31 yrs old now, and in the Armed forces. It is hard to find dojos to train at sometimes due to location. But i always train in the Kyokushin manor, all be it alone sometimes or with a friend who wishes to come along for the contact or fitness.

Due to being in the Armed forces for many years now, i have not been able to gain my Shodan (a life long ambition) and Dans above, But i still fight in armed forces competitions.
I am leaving the Forces next year and look forward to doing some serious training, hopefully living my life long dream of earning my Shodan and above. My wonderful Wife nows how much...and must be sick of me going on about it!! haha

I LIVE AND BREATH KYOKUSHIN.

Irespect all other styles... but because Kyokushin is in my blood, i can only give myself to the great style of Mas Oyama!!

OSU!!!

Roadrunner
10-06-2008, 04:53 PM
I have studied many different styles of Martial arts but never felt like I belong to them, yet I had great Senseis Then when I was introduced to Kyokushin it becane my life . It felt like I was home. Thank You Kyokushin

ScarBurner
11-18-2008, 02:59 AM
Osu! I want to make Kyokushin my way of life. Since becoming a karateka, I have quit smoking, drinking and late partying. I am also feeling stronger and more confident. If I take it as a hobby, I might succumb to my past behaviors. Dedicating your life to Karate may also give you a deeper appreciation of the Budo. Osu!

vapor
11-18-2008, 03:02 AM
ScarBurner,

Thanks for the post, can I ask that you jump over to the INTRODUCTIONS forum, and tell us a bit about yourself, so that we can give you a proper welcome and OSU!?

vapor

bobh
12-20-2008, 07:01 PM
Osu! Kyokushin is a way of life for me. That does not mean it comprises my entire way of living. It does permeate just about everything I do. I can no longer separate karate as a distinct compartmentalized aspect of who I am. Christianity is a way of life but does not address physical training as a part of the whole person. Or does it? Any theologians out there?

senshido
12-20-2008, 07:24 PM
I wholeheartedly agree with Gary, it can become an obsession which is not good... any obsession is not good.
Kyokushin / Enshin / Ashihara (and others) install a good moral attitude (usually). but dont let these things RULE your life.
You have to believe in yourself first and foremost

Roadrunner
12-20-2008, 07:28 PM
Kyokushin is my way of life. I am a christian, but I was from my earliest memory, But when I started Kyokushin. I felt more like I had to live up to my beliefs, Like my father always said be loyal to yourself and that is the only person you can not fool. I feel like I am a stronger in life and in being a christian. Thank you Kyokushin fo9r giving me a reality check

bobh
12-20-2008, 07:44 PM
Kyokushin is my way of life. I am a christian, but I was from my earliest memory, But when I started Kyokushin. I felt more like I had to live up to my beliefs, Like my father always said be loyal to yourself and that is the only person you can not fool. I feel like I am a stronger in life and in being a christian. Thank you Kyokushin fo9r giving me a reality check

Are you saying that you feel the Kyokushin Way has improved you as a Christian?
Osu-JP1

Roadrunner
12-20-2008, 11:21 PM
Yes I really do I am more focus on what I do and what is more important in life.

powerof0ne
12-21-2008, 02:52 AM
I'm not a Kyokushin practitioner but I like knockdown kumite. I'd say martial arts are a way of my life. I can't explain why but like many of you I can "bs" for hours, especially with my father about karate, muay thai, mma, jiu jitsu, shooto, kakutogi, boxing, etc. I guess I'm kind of a snob and generally only like to talk to people that have trained and have some understanding of what they're talking about or someone that at least tries to understand it vs. the average drunk watching some fighting event thinking he/she is an expert on the subject.
I've competed in a few knockdown tournys and muay thai fights and have taught karate/muay thai at a few different schools. At one point in my life I was even trying to make somewhat of a living at it and actually turned down an opportunity to open up a branch of a muay thai association which I regret :) I dunno why, but I love martial arts..some I don't like but others I like a lot. I don't say Osu like some of you on here because my background is in more than just Japanese/budo arts that like to say Osu a lot :) however...I have spent enough years in dojo saying Osu religiously. If I ever meet any of you in person I will gladly and respectfully say Osu or Sawadee Krap back (whichever I'm told).

Dent
12-21-2008, 12:29 PM
Osu!

I can't explain why but like many of you I can "bs" for hours, especially with my father about karate, muay thai, mma, jiu jitsu, shooto, kakutogi, boxing, etc. I guess I'm kind of a snob and generally only like to talk to people that have trained and have some understanding of what they're talking about .

"Sufferers of the same disease have much to talk about." Proverb ;)

Osu!

jcc
12-21-2008, 04:01 PM
Osu! powerofOne,

I think Dent is fishing for a visit there! :)

Osu!

Dent
12-21-2008, 04:28 PM
Osu!

Osu! powerofOne,

I think Dent is fishing for a visit there! :)

Osu!

"I cast my bread upon the waters..." ;)

Osu!

joeurgod
12-21-2008, 05:19 PM
kyokushin is a way of life to me. it is my life. before kyokushin i was depress and my life felt so routine that it was choking my soul to death. when i found kyokushin, my routine life was broken and now i look forward to everyday that i can practice, never missing a class. kyokushin is life to me. there is nothing else

senshido
04-25-2009, 09:29 PM
Sensei Joe,
Please no more advertising your articles.. enough!!